Posts

Taste for a Cure 2019

PAA is thrilled to announce that Taste for a Cure 2019, presented by the Ernest G. DeBakey Charitable Foundation, is Thursday, April 11 at 6:00 PM. Join us at Haven on World Parkinson’s Day for another great evening of:

Proceeds from Taste for a Cure 2019 benefit medical research towards a cure for Parkinson’s disease. Follow this link to purchase tickets online now. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for the latest event details. If you’d like to be a sponsor for this event, please contact Mary T Miller for more information.

Tears May Be Used as Biological Marker to Detect Parkinson’s Disease

By Jose Marques Lopes, PhD

Tears may be used to diagnose Parkinson’s disease, according to preliminary findings of a study that will be presented at the 2018 American Academy of Neurology’s (AAN) Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, California, April 21-27.

“We believe our research is the first to show that tears may be a reliable, inexpensive and noninvasive biological marker of Parkinson’s,” Mark Lew, MD, the study’s author from the Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, said in a press release.

Parkinson’s disease is mainly characterized by selective loss of neurons that produce dopamine in a brain area called substantia nigra. Patients with Parkinson’s typically exhibit Lewy bodies – protein clumps mainly composed of aggregated alpha-synuclein – in the brain, leading to nerve damage and disease progression.

Besides pathological changes in the brain, the disease also affects nerve function in the periphery. As the secretory cells of the tear gland are stimulated by nerves, researchers hypothesized that nerve changes in Parkinson’s could result in altered protein levels in tears.

The scientists collected tear samples from 55 Parkinson’s patients and 27 healthy controls who were the same age and gender.

The tears were analyzed for the levels of four proteins. The results revealed that levels of normal, non-clumped alpha-synuclein were lower in Parkinson’s patients than in controls. However, levels of unhealthy, aggregated alpha-synuclein were increased in tears of Parkinson’s patients (1.45 nanograms per milligram of tear proteins versus 0.27 nanograms, respectively).

Researchers hypothesize that the secretory cells in the tear gland could themselves produce these different forms of alpha-synuclein, which would be secreted directly into tears.

“Knowing that something as simple as tears could help neurologists differentiate between people who have Parkinson’s disease and those who don’t in a noninvasive manner is exciting,” Lew said.

“And because the Parkinson’s disease process can begin years or decades before symptoms appear, a biological marker like this could be useful in diagnosing, or even treating, the disease earlier,” he added.

Nonetheless, larger studies need to be done to evaluate whether these changes in alpha-synuclein levels can be detected in tears from Parkinson’s patients before symptoms start.

The post Tears May Be Used as Biological Marker to Detect Parkinson’s Disease appeared first on Parkinson’s News Today.

Source:: Parkinson’s Today

Save the Date! Taste for a Cure 2018

Save the date Birmingham! PAA is thrilled to announce that Taste for a Cure 2018, presented by the Ernest G. DeBakey Charitable Foundation, is Thursday, April 19 at 6:00 PM. We look forward to seeing you at Haven for another great evening of:

Proceeds benefit medical research towards a cure for Parkinson’s disease. Tickets may be purchased online now and you can follow us on Facebook or Twitter for the latest updates. If you’d like to be a sponsor for this event, please contact Mary T Miller for more information.

 

Visual system changes that may signal parkinson’s disease

Changes in the visual systems of newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease patients may provide important biomarkers for the early detection and monitoring of the disease, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.

“Just as the eye is a window into the body, the visual system is a window into brain disorders,” said lead researcher Alessandro Arrigo, M.D., a resident in ophthalmology at the University Vita-Salute San Raffaele of Milan, Italy.

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative condition caused by neuronal loss in several brain structures. Parkinson’s disease is characterized by tremors, rigidity or stiffness throughout the body, and impaired balance and coordination.

“Although Parkinson’s disease is primarily considered a motor disorder, several studies have shown non-motor symptoms are common across all stages of the disease,” Dr. Arrigo said. “However, these symptoms are often undiagnosed because patients are unaware of the link to the disease and, as a result, they may be under-treated.”

Non-motor symptoms experienced by patients with Parkinson’s disease include visual alterations such as an inability to perceive colors, a change in visual acuity, and a decrease in blinking which can lead to dry eye. Read more…

Source: Science Daily

Online Survey Participants Needed: Alabama PD Patients and Caregivers

Find a Cure Panel (FACP) specializes in patient research for rare and serious diseases and they have some confidential and anonymous online research for people and caregivers with PD. If you complete the survey, FACP will donate $50 to the Parkinson’s Association of Alabama.

The completed survey is tracked anonymously off the customized link below.

To qualify for this online survey,

1)      You or your loved must have had PD for 5+ years;

2)      a) Your or your loved one must have or had experience with DBS OR b) be currently on Sinemet or Rytary or their generics.

3)      PD must have some impact on your life. If you have NO off time then you will not qualify for this research.

4)      It’s best to take the survey on a computer/ipad/tablet and NOT a smart phone.

If you are interested in participating, please click on the survey link below.

Survey link

https://www.sampleczar.com/survey/SC_RD.aspx?supplier_id=5096

If you have any questions about participating, please email FACP at info@findacurepanel.com

Purchase Tickets Now! Taste for a Cure 2017

PAA is thrilled to announce that tickets are now on sale for Taste for a Cure 2017We look forward to seeing you at Haven on  Thursday, April 27 at 6:30 PM for another great evening of:

Proceeds benefit medical research towards a cure for Parkinson’s disease. Follow us on Facebook or Twitter for the latest event announcements and contact Mary T Miller if you’d like to be a sponsor or need additional information.

Click this link to purchase tickets online from the secure PAA digital ticketing hub provided by the awesome folks at Instagift.

Save the Date! Taste for a Cure 2017

Save the date Birmingham! PAA is thrilled to announce that Taste for a Cure 2017 is Thursday, April 27 at 6:30 PM. We look forward to seeing you at Haven for another great evening of:

Proceeds benefit medical research towards a cure for Parkinson’s disease. Options to purchase tickets online will be available soon and you can follow us on Facebook or Twitter for the latest updates. If you’d like to be a sponsor for this event, please contact Mary T Miller for more information.

 

Breaking News: A New Dyskinesia Drug Will Be Submitted to FDA This Year

By Holly Teichholtz

A new formulation of amantadine to better treat levodopa-induced dyskinesia is entering the home stretch. Its developer, Emeryville, California-based biotech Adamas Pharmaceuticals, expects to file an NDA (New Drug Application) with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration later this year.

According to Nasdaq:

“Data from the study demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in LID at 12 weeks in patients receiving ADS-5102 compared with placebo, as assessed by the Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale (UDysRS). The candidate was safe and generally well tolerated. The study met its primary endpoint.[…] Results from the study showed an improvement in activities of daily living (ADLs) in PD patients.”

As FoxFeed reported in December 2015, the company measured the impact of the drug using a new dyskinesia rating scale developed by Chris Goetz, MD, and Glenn Stebbins, PhD, of Rush University Medical Center with support from The Michael J. Fox Foundation.

Source:: Fox Feed Blog