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2018 Alabama Parkinson Fighter Walk & 5K: Event Recap

Thanks to the PAA Jr. Board and other volunteers, the 2018 Alabama Parkinson Fighter Walk & 5K was a huge success! This years event included 350 participants and raised over…CLICK TO READ MORE

Adaptive fitness class focused on Parkinson’s patients

Registration is now open for Adaptive Fitness at EW Motion therapy. Taught by Katie Cederberg (ACSM CPT) Adaptive Fitness is designed for Parkinson’s patients to increase overall fitness through evidence-based, safe, and effective full body workouts. The class seeks to improve participant balance, strength, flexibility, and mobility with adaptive exercises using exercise bands, medicine balls, weights, and Kettlebells. All exercises are adapted to fit each person’s strength and individual needs, including the option for chair, or wheel-chair based exercises.

The cost is $30 per class or $200 for 8 sessions. The class is taught each Saturday at 10:30 AM. CLICK THIS LINK TO SIGN-UP FOR THE CLASS ONLINE.

Katie Cederberg, ACSM CPT, is a doctoral student in the Rehabilitation Science Program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where she dedicates her time and effort to increasing physical activity and exercise for people with physical disabilities. She received her Bachelor’s degree from Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon and her Master’s Degree in Exercise Science from Central Washington University. She previously worked as a fitness specialist at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, Oregon where she developed individualized exercise programs for people with and without disabilities.

It Doesn’t Matter What Exercise as Long as You’re Exercising

By Sherri Woodbridge

Several years ago, when I was diagnosed with young onset PD, it seemed the rage in beneficial exercise for people with Parkinson’s disease was bicycling. A few years later, the craze seemed to turn to dance. Now it seems as though boxing could be the in thing. As the others appear to come and go in cycles, one form of exercise that appears to remain consistent and advantageous is tai chi.

The question is, what exercise is best? I think the simple answer is whatever feels best and whatever you enjoy. None of it is bad for you and the most important thing is just to be doing something.

A real prospect exists that the physical movement involved in riding a bicycle, and in certain other forms of exercise, may alleviate the symptoms of the neurodegenerative condition we know more intimately as Parkinson’s disease.

The observation made by a research scientist from the Cleveland Clinic, in Ohio, that the physical symptoms associated with Parkinson’s appeared to improve in a personal friend who had ridden a tandem cycle. It seemed that there was a connection between forcing patients to move their legs faster than they would have otherwise been able to on their own, and because of this, there was a significant improvement in relieving symptoms.

In fact, further research from the Cleveland Clinic showed that forced exercise appeared to be more effective than drug treatment at improving symptoms in those with PD. They even went so far to suggest that forced exercise can also decrease some of the cognitive problems that can be associated with PD.

Studies have also shown that dance may be an effective alternative to traditional exercise for those with Parkinson’s disease. Staying active is crucial for those of us who have PD and dancing has been shown to lessen tremors and improve flexibility, as well as lifting mood.

“The positive effect that dancing has on us is quite magical,” says Alison Underwood, diagnosed with PD 10 years ago and now in her 60s. I don’t know about you, but I could use a little magic while living with this little monster we call Parkinson’s disease.

Boxing is definitely on the list of exercise popular among PD patients of late. Of course, it may not be the exercise of choice for everyone, but it has definitely become trendy. One such program is called Rock Steady Boxing. It is a non-contact program specifically designed for those with Parkinson’s to help strengthen motor skills, balance, speech, and sensory function.

A side benefit of getting out and getting some exercise is being around other people like us, those who struggle day-to-day with symptoms pertaining to PD. We can encourage each other to keep on keeping on.

 

Source:: Parkinson’s Today

Parkinson’s patients find balance, stamina in ‘Rock Steady’ fitness class

By Kym Klass

Jack Noble has noticed two positive changes in his body since attending the Rock Steady Boxing class at MetroFitness: his breathing, and his stamina.

The 85-year-old was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease four years ago, and in this new class brought to the east Montgomery fitness center that focuses on strength, balance and agility, Noble appreciates it for its movement and for “really feeling like I’m getting a workout.”

With more than 10 million people worldwide living with Parkinson’s disease — 60,000 Americans are diagnosed every year — exercise has been proven to help alleviate…CLICK TO READ FULL ARTICLE

Source: Montgomery Advertiser

 

ParkinsonTV Episode 1: Exercise and Parkinson’s

PAA is thrilled to highlight ParkinsonTV, a PD information resource initiative for patients, caregivers, and medical professionals piloted by the University of Rochester, in collaboration with Dr. Bas Bloem and Radboud University in the Netherlands.

This educational TV series brings together neurologists, patients, and topic experts to discuss different aspects of living with Parkinson’s and ways to maximize quality of life. The first season will consist of six episodes on exercise, medication, nutrition, advanced therapies, speech therapy, and occupational therapy with new episodes airing each Tuesday at 8:00PM.

2015 Birmingham Symposium Video Recap 5: Exercise RX for PD by Marcas Bamman

We are pleased to present part 5 of an 8 part video series recapping the 2015 Birmingham Symposium hosted by The Parkinson Association of Alabama. Click the following link to watch the video: Exercise RX for PD by Dr. Marcas Bamman.