Adaptive fitness class focused on Parkinson’s patients

Registration is now open for Adaptive Fitness at EW Motion therapy. Taught by Katie Cederberg (ACSM CPT) Adaptive Fitness is designed for Parkinson’s patients to increase overall fitness through evidence-based, safe, and effective full body workouts. The class seeks to improve participant balance, strength, flexibility, and mobility with adaptive exercises using exercise bands, medicine balls, weights, and Kettlebells. All exercises are adapted to fit each person’s strength and individual needs, including the option for chair, or wheel-chair based exercises.

The cost is $30 per class or $200 for 8 sessions. The class is taught each Saturday at 10:30 AM. CLICK THIS LINK TO SIGN-UP FOR THE CLASS ONLINE.

Katie Cederberg, ACSM CPT, is a doctoral student in the Rehabilitation Science Program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where she dedicates her time and effort to increasing physical activity and exercise for people with physical disabilities. She received her Bachelor’s degree from Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon and her Master’s Degree in Exercise Science from Central Washington University. She previously worked as a fitness specialist at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, Oregon where she developed individualized exercise programs for people with and without disabilities.

Sniff Test for Parkinson’s Disease

By Michael J. Fox Foundation

Lack of objective tests to diagnose Parkinson’s disease (PD) challenges drug development and patient care. While scientists are looking to pinpoint PD earlier through skin and spinal fluid, there is also promising research on some less invasive methods. In this podcast, host Dave Iverson talks with two researchers on the significance of these non-invasive tests.

“What we’re doing now is to really try and identify whether there’s a particular secretion in the skin of Parkinson’s patients and what it smells like and then how can we detect it,” says Samantha Hutten, PhD, senior associate director at The Michael J. Fox Foundation, which is funding projects to sniff out Parkinson’s disease.

Another MJFF-funded study led by Mark Baron, MD, professor of neurology at Virginia Commonwealth University, breaks down what eye movement means in relation to PD.

“If you look at a target — assuming we aren’t going to have Parkinson’s disease — and we stare at a dot on a screen, our eye is not moving. People with Parkinson’s disease — it’s moving in all directions, so it’s not staying perfectly still,” says Dr. Baron.

Tune into to the live discussion in our next webinar this Thursday, October 19, at 12 p.m., where we discuss how these screening methods and others could lead to earlier PD diagnosis. Register today.

Like what you hear? Subscribe to The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson’s Podcast in iTunes or your podcast mobile app. Please consider leaving us a rating on iTunes and sharing the series with your network.

Learn more about the search for a test for Parkinson’s disease in our guide.

View a text transcript of this podcast.

Source:: MJFF Podcasts

Parkinson’s patients find balance, stamina in ‘Rock Steady’ fitness class

By Kym Klass

Jack Noble has noticed two positive changes in his body since attending the Rock Steady Boxing class at MetroFitness: his breathing, and his stamina.

The 85-year-old was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease four years ago, and in this new class brought to the east Montgomery fitness center that focuses on strength, balance and agility, Noble appreciates it for its movement and for “really feeling like I’m getting a workout.”

With more than 10 million people worldwide living with Parkinson’s disease — 60,000 Americans are diagnosed every year — exercise has been proven to help alleviate…CLICK TO READ FULL ARTICLE

Source: Montgomery Advertiser