Exercise is Regenerative Medicine: Impact on Parkinson’s Disease

The May NeuroScience Cafe is right around the corner and this month’s topic is Exercise is Regenerative Medicine: Impact on Parkinson’s Disease. Brought to you by UAB’s Comprehensive Neuroscience Center (CNC), the May cafe will be held at the Hoover Public Library (200 Municipal Drive, Hoover, AL 35216) Monday, May 21 at 6:30 PM and lead by Dr. Marcas Bamman from the Department of Neurology at UAB.

The overall goal of these cafés is to help educate the public on the latest clinical care and neuroscience-related research taking place at UAB. Our audience is typically made up of older adults as well as individuals and family members who have been affected by the topic. The program runs for about an hour and is very casual and relaxed!

We would love for anyone involved in the Parkinson Association of Alabama to come and learn about the insights from neuroscience research.

January CNC NeuroScience Cafe: The Brain-Gut Connection

The January NeuroScience Cafe is right around the corner and this month’s topic is The Brain-Gut Connection: Parkinson’s Disease. Brought to you by UAB’s Comprehensive Neuroscience Center (CNC), the January cafe will be held at the Hoover Public Library (200 Municipal Drive, Hoover, AL 35216) on Monday, January 22 at 6:30 PM and lead by Dr. Haydeh Payami from the Department of Neurology at UAB.

The overall goal of these cafés is to help educate the public on the latest clinical care and neuroscience-related research taking place at UAB. Our audience is typically made up of older adults as well as individuals and family members who have been affected by the topic. The program runs for about an hour and is very casual and relaxed!

We would love for anyone involved in the Parkinson Association of Alabama to come and learn about the insights from neuroscience research

The Evolution of Treatment for Parkinson’s Disease

By Wendy Henderson

In this video from TIME, learn about the evolution of Parkinson’s disease treatment since the late 1950s. Vice president of media communications for the Michael J. Fox Foundation, Dr. Rachel Dolhun, discusses how treatment for the disease has developed over the years.

MORE: How does Parkinson’s disease affect the brain?

Dr. Dolhun explains that while the diagnosis procedure for Parkinson’s disease hasn’t changed too much since the 1950s, the way the disease is treated has changed substantially. Back then, there were no treatments for Parkinson’s disease and now there are many treatments to help with the symptoms of the condition. In addition, five new treatments are currently in clinical trials that may slow or stop the progression of the disease.

As well as medications, surgeries such as deep brain stimulation have help modern day Parkinson’s patients overcome some of the more pronounced symptoms of the disease.

MORE: Three causes of psychosis in Parkinson’s disease

Parkinsons’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

The post The Evolution of Treatment for Parkinson’s Disease appeared first on Parkinson’s News Today.

Source:: Parkinson’s Today

Caregiver Insights from the Parkinson’s Foundation

While your loved one’s Parkinson’s diagnosis probably changed your life overnight, caregiver is a role and an identity that you grow into, and it does not have to erase or replace any existing ways you self-identify. In this session from our 2016 Caregiver Summit, Susan Hedlund, MSW, LCSW, shared how you can continue to experience the love, friendship, contribution to society, ideas, and sense of wholeness that you need to grow as your own person, while you and your loved one face Parkinson’s together.

Whether you care for someone who is recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD), are adapting to new challenges as the disease progresses or have been living with PD for a long time, a strong support network is essential for your wellbeing and the wellbeing of the person with Parkinson’s. Making sure you are taken care of, too, can help create a productive partnership that minimizes stress and conflict. Benefits include revitalized energy, renewed interest in creative endeavors, new subjects to talk about and the realization that you and your partner are not alone.

Parkinson’s is a progressive disease, meaning that it changes over time. That can make it hard to define your role, as your involvement will change along the way. Responsibilities may include helping a loved one with daily activities, managing medications and making financial decisions.

Whatever your responsibilities, define “caregiving” for yourself. Especially early in the Parkinson’s journey, you might not feel like you are actually “giving” care. Similarly, your loved one might not see himself or herself as someone in need of care. But remember, care is not limited to physical tasks. Care can be emotional and spiritual as well as physical.

Source: Parkinson’s Foundation

9 Ways to Manage Brain Fog

By Wendy Henderson

One of the most frustrating symptoms of living with a chronic illness is brain fog. There are medications to treat many symptoms of chronic diseases, but sadly there isn’t yet a pill that takes away brain fog. However, there are ways to deal with it so patients can minimize its effects and lead a normal life.

We’ve put together a list of 10 ways to help manage brain fog, with help from princessinthetower.org, newlifeoutlook.com, and Web MD.

Write Things Down
Everyone forgets things now and then, but having brain fog often means forgetting important dates and occasions. Keep a to-do list and a calendar in a highly visible location, or use an online diary to keep track of what each day holds. There are many mobile apps that can also help with organization.

Exercise the Body
Exercise offers a chance to turn off from all the usual things that occupy the mind. It can also improve sleep, which can in turn improve cognitive skills.

Exercise the Mind
Take the time to do thought-challenging exercises like crosswords, sudoku and jigsaw puzzles, or learn a new language. In addition, maintaining a hobby will keep the mind focused on something positive.

MORE: 10 benefits of having a service or therapy dog when you have Parkinson’s

Pick the Right Time of Day
Whether a morning lark or night owl, we all have certain times when we feel more alert. Choose a time each day when your concentration is at its highest to tackle difficult and complex tasks.

Eat a Brain-Healthy Diet
Eat lots of good fats known for brain health such as nuts, avocados, coconut oil, and omega-3-rich foods.

Get Plenty of Rest
Quality sleep and restorative naps (when appropriate) can dramatically improve cognitive health. Try to keep to a routine bedtime and waking time, even on the weekend, to promote a good sleep pattern.

MORE: How you can manage fatigue with corrective stretching exercises

Go Easy on Yourself
Don’t overdo it. Ask for help when needed and try to rest as much as possible to conserve energy. Participate in calming activities like taking a stroll through a peaceful spot, reading a book, or listening to music.

Organize Your Home and Workspace
Reorganize your living and working space so that everything you need regularly is easily accessible. This can help conserve energy and provide peace of mind.

Plan Ahead
If brain fog is worse first thing in the morning, laying out clothes the night before will be one less thing to have to stress over in the morning. Sort meds into a daily medication box so you know when you’re up to date and can easily make sure you haven’t forgotten to take them (or don’t take them more than once).

MORE: New Microsoft watch can quiet Parkinson’s tremors

Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

The post 9 Ways to Manage Brain Fog appeared first on Parkinson’s News Today.

Source:: Parkinson’s Today

ParkinsonTV Episode 1: Exercise and Parkinson’s

PAA is thrilled to highlight ParkinsonTV, a PD information resource initiative for patients, caregivers, and medical professionals piloted by the University of Rochester, in collaboration with Dr. Bas Bloem and Radboud University in the Netherlands.

This educational TV series brings together neurologists, patients, and topic experts to discuss different aspects of living with Parkinson’s and ways to maximize quality of life. The first season will consist of six episodes on exercise, medication, nutrition, advanced therapies, speech therapy, and occupational therapy with new episodes airing each Tuesday at 8:00PM.

NeuroScience Cafe at the Emmet O’Neal Library

The UAB Comprehensive NeuroScience Center is hosting a Parkinson’s Disease Update as part of their NeuroScience Cafe series this Thursday, September 14 at 6:30PM from the Emmet O’Neal Library. This interactive presentation will provide an update from thought leaders at UAB Neurology on efforts to combat Parkinson’s disease in the lab and the clinic. This can’t miss event is free, open to the public, and all interested patients, caregivers, and medical professionals are encouraged to attend.

Where: Emmett O’Neal Library, 50 Oak Street, Mountain Brook AL, 35213

When: Thursday, September 14 at 6:30 PM

CLICK THIS LINK FOR MORE INFORMATION

 

MJFF Podcast: Treating Parkinson’s Hallucinations and Delusions

By Michael J. Fox Foundation

This week’s MJFF Podcast features Dr. Rachel Dolhun and explores Parkinson’s disease psychosis, including hallucinations and delusions, and discusses treatments for this symptom.

Parkinson’s disease psychosis can affect up to 40 to 50 percent of people with the disease. It can include hallucinations (seeing things that aren’t there) and delusions (fixed, false beliefs).

To treat this symptom, doctors have used traditional anti-psychotic drugs, but those have presented challenges.

“The problem with [traditional anti-psychotic] medications is that they block the dopamine receptors or they decrease the dopamine, and as people with Parkinson’s disease know pretty well, dopamine is what’s lost in Parkinson’s,” says Rachel Dolhun, MD, vice president of medical communications at MJFF. “So if we’re blocking the dopamine that we’re trying to already replace with our [Parkinson’s] medications, we can potentially worsen the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.”

Earlier this month, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a drug, called Nuplazid, which was specifically designed to treat Parkinson’s psychosis without interfering with a patient’s dopamine medications.

Hear more from Dr. Dolhun about PD psychosis and Nuplazid through the Third Thursday Webinar from The Michael J Fox Foundation on May 19, 2016 at 12 p.m. ET/9 a.m. PT. Register now.

Source:: MJFF Podcasts

Attend a Partners in Parkinson’s Event from Your Own Home

By Allyse Falce

On May 14, Partners in Parkinson’s will broadcast a full day of educational panels online, available to view on any computer, laptop, tablet or phone.

Partners in Parkinson’s is an educational initiative developed by The Michael J. Fox Foundation and the pharmaceutical company AbbVie to connect the Parkinson’s community with information and resources to optimize one’s care. These full-day events feature sessions with clinicians, researchers, allied health care professionals and people living with Parkinson’s and their loved ones.

To date, Partners in Parkinson’s has hosted 22 in-person events in major metropolitan areas across the United States. This marks the first online event, free and open to anyone with an Internet connection.

When:
Saturday, May 14
12 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. ET/9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. PT
Register Now

Topics of discussion will include:

  • How Parkinson’s impacts everyone differently
  • How to tailor a care team that meets your specific needs
  • What to know, ask and expect from an appointment with a movement disorder specialist
  • What is happening in Parkinson’s disease research
  • How to build a healthy and active lifestyle

Viewers will have the opportunity to submit questions to our moderator and panelists throughout the day.

Not available on May 14? This virtual program will be available later this year to watch on-demand.

For more information, or to RSVP, visit partnersinparkinsons.org.

Source:: Fox Feed Blog

APDA Newsletter for Winter 2016

PAA is proud to share the Winter 2016 edition of the American Parkinson’s Disease Association (APDA) Newsletter, Insights. Please click the following link to download: APDA Newsletter for Winter 2016.