Antipsychotics increase risk of death in people with Parkinson’s disease psychosis

Antipsychotic drugs may increase the risk of death in people with Parkinson’s disease psychosis (PDP), according to a new study. PDP affects more than 50 per cent of people with Parkinson’s at some point in their condition and antipsychotic drugs are often used to treat this psychosis, yet there is little evidence to support their use.

Source:: Science Daily

UAB Neurology – 2015 Parkinson’s Research Progress Report

The Parkinson Association of Alabama is thankful for it’s partnership with UAB and proud of their ongoing research contributions to accelerate a cure for Parkinson’s Disease. We are excited to share the 2015 Parkinson’s Research Progress Report from the UAB Department of Neurology and hope you’ll take a moment to review.

New technique negotiates neuron jungle to target source of Parkinson’s disease

Researchers believe they have found a potential new way to target cells of the brain affected by Parkinson’s disease. The new technique is relatively non-invasive and has worked to improve symptoms of the disease in rats.

Source:: Science Daily

New study maps the progression of Parkinson’s disease within the brain

Scientists have made advances in understanding the process involved in the progression and spread of Parkinson’s disease within the brain. The study focused on understanding the process that drives the disease’s progression by mapping the distribution and degree of atrophy, characteristic of the disease, in certain brain regions and identify the paths leading the spread from affected to healthy tissue.

Source:: Science Daily

Polo for Parkinson’s: October 11th


Polo for Parkinson’s: October 11th

Please join us in Alpharetta, GA for a polo match with a purpose!

Don’t miss our eighth-annual fundraiser, featuring an exciting polo match, silent auction, BBQ lunch, open bar, ladies’ hat contest and more!

DETAILS
Sunday, October 11
Chukkar Farm & Polo Club
1140 Liberty Grove Road, Alpharetta, GA 30004
Gates: 1:00pm Polo Match: 2:00pm
Cost: Adults $50, Children $5
BUY TICKETS

Our silent auction is more exciting than ever! Artwork, signed celebrity & sports memorabilia, vacations, jewelry, restaurant gift certificates, movie passes, gift baskets, wine, workout passes, Falcons tickets, salon services, golf outings, pet services, and much, much more.

Also returning in 2015 is the “Ask the Expert” table, where attendees are invited to speak directly to Parkinson’s Disease specialists about recent research findings, new treatments, and clinical trials.

We hope to see you in October!

RSVP via Facebook and invite your friends

2015 SPONSORS

Schreeder, Wheeler & Flint Kroger 'Cue BBQ

Nalley Lexus Roswell Coker Group Holdings

Lamar Outdoor Boardworks

Clear Channel Outdoor North Georgia Promotions

Comcast

Mark your calendar for these other upcoming PD events in the Southeast:

Countrified Rock for Research
Thursday, September 24

– Wilkins Parkinson’s Foundation

Twitter @wilkinspf WPF on Facebook

Copyright © 2015 Wilkins Parkinson’s Foundation, All rights reserved.

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Source:: Wilkins Summer Newsletter

Parkinson’s disease: Everyday activity more beneficial than occasional strenuous exercise

Parkinson’s patients often become sedentary because of motor symptoms such as gait, balance problems or falls. However, new research finds that non-exercise physical activity, more than occasional trips to the gym, is linked to less severe motor symptoms.

Source:: Science Daily

Find a Potion for Parkinson’s

PAA is thrilled to be a part of the Find a Potion for Parkinson’s event – a 10K/5K and 1 mile fun run/walk from our friends in Jasper on Halloween morning. All proceeds benefit Parkinson’s disease research and we can’t wait to see you there!

Location: Jasper, Alabama (Gamble Park) 10K/5K starts at 9:00 – Fun run/walk starts at 8:30

  • Please click this link to download an entry form
  • Entry Fee: 10K: $30 5K: $25 Fun Run: $15 Due by Friday, October 16th.
  • If you sign-up by October 16th, you are guaranteed a t-shirt.
  • After October 16th through day of race, entry fees are: 10K: $35, 5K: $30, Fun run: $20
  • T-shirts are not guaranteed after October 16th. We will order a few extra, but they will be issued first come, first serve.
  • There will be a Packet Pick up (Bibb and shirt) at Inspire Fitness (511 19th ST West) Friday, October 30th from 4pm-6pm. If you can’t make the pickup, you may pick your packet up the day of the run at 7am.
  • If you plan to register for the run on October 31st, please be at Gamble at 7am. Registration will close at 7:45 AM.
  • Minimal age for the 10k/5k portion is 14, with parental consent.
  • There will be a costume contest. The judging will be held prior to the 10k/5k at 8:00.
  • Costumes are optional. Please, NO scary costumes! We want happy , wacky, silly or heroic costumes. You will be disqualified for scary costumes.
  • Categories for Costume Contest: Team/Group and Kids Individual
  • All participants in the 10k and 5k will receive “Finisher Medals.”
  • Trophies will be awarded at the end of the race for the top 3 male and top 3 female runners who participated in the 10K and 5K.
  • Please click this link to download an entry form

Smart cells teach neurons damaged by Parkinson’s to heal themselves

As a potential treatment for Parkinson’s disease, scientists have created smarter immune cells that produce and deliver a healing protein to the brain while also teaching neurons to begin making the protein for themselves.

Source:: Science Daily

Major complication of Parkinson’s therapy explained

Researchers have discovered why long-term use of levodopa treatment commonly leads to a side effect that can be as debilitating as Parkinson’s disease itself.

Source:: Science Daily

External brain stimulation temporarily improves motor symptoms in people with Parkinson’s

People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) tend to slow down and decrease the intensity of their movements even though many retain the ability to move quickly and forcefully. Now, scientists report evidence that the slowdown likely arises from the brain’s ‘cost/benefit analysis,’ which gets skewed by the loss of dopamine in people with PD. In addition, their small study demonstrated that noninvasive electrical stimulation of the brain corrected temporarily improved some patients’ motor symptoms.

Source:: Science Daily